Homestuck
A young man stands in his bedroom. It just so happens that today, the 13th of April, is this young man's birthday. Though it was thirteen years ago he was given life, it is only today he will be given a name!

What will the name of this young man be?
Posted at 12:59am on July 28th - 18631 NOTES

gallifreyglo:

securelyinsecure:

Throwback - Celebrities Recreate Iconic Covers for Ebony Magazine’s 65th Anniversary (2010)

To celebrate its 65th anniversary issue and icons of the past and present, EBONY magazine asked their favorite entertainers to pose in modern-day recreations of those covers for a one-of-a-kind look back at the past.

Featuring: Regina King (as Eartha Kitt), Mary J. Blige (as Diana Ross), Nia Long (as Dorothy Dandridge), John Legend (as Duke Ellington), Lamman Rucker (as Richard Roundtree), Taraji P. Henson (as Diahann Carroll), Blair Underwood (as Sidney Poitier), Jurnee Smollett (as Lena Horne), Usher Raymond (as Sammy Davis, Jr.), and Samuel L. Jackson (as Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.), among others.

Love this!

(Source: straightfromthea.com)

Posted at 12:58am on July 28th - 10388 NOTES

whatpumpkin:

Troll Horns are now available at What Pumpkin

Currently, only Aradia’s, Tavros’ and Karkat’s horns are available, but we’ll be releasing more in due time!

Posted at 12:57am on July 28th - 739859 NOTES

thatfunnyblog:

The American collegiate system in one gif set

(Source: sandandglass)

Posted at 12:55am on July 28th - 219 NOTES


Tony Stark replaced all of the hand soap in the Avenger’s Tower with dish soap because of its abilities to wash away oil and grease that’s left on his hands after working in the lab.

Tony Stark replaced all of the hand soap in the Avenger’s Tower with dish soap because of its abilities to wash away oil and grease that’s left on his hands after working in the lab.

Posted at 12:54am on July 28th - 3679 NOTES

micdotcom:

One headline perfectly captures the U.S. media’s Israel problem

Cairo-based photojournalist Mosa’ab Elshamy caught this headline from the Monday edition of the Baltimore Sun that seems to capture Palestinian sympathizers’ frustration with mainstream media coverage of the ongoing conflict in Gaza. While Israeli combat fatalities are given up-front attention, Palestinian fatalities are brushed off as “others.”
Why you should care | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

One headline perfectly captures the U.S. media’s Israel problem

Cairo-based photojournalist Mosa’ab Elshamy caught this headline from the Monday edition of the Baltimore Sun that seems to capture Palestinian sympathizers’ frustration with mainstream media coverage of the ongoing conflict in Gaza. While Israeli combat fatalities are given up-front attention, Palestinian fatalities are brushed off as “others.”

Why you should care | Follow micdotcom 

Posted at 12:53am on July 28th - 108 NOTES


Contrary to popular belief, Charles Xavier is not the first person that Raven truly loved. During her days when she was scavenging for food, Raven met someone who offered her love and care who was around the same age as her. They quickly became friends, and Raven felt something special towards this girl named Irene Adler. However, due to Irene’s power which enables her to foresee the future, she urged Raven to leave her behind immediately because of the devastation that will occur if she stayed any longer. This is why Raven did not want Charles to get into her head, because it will open up the wounds that may never heal completely and the trauma it caused. The fact that Charles reminds her a little bit of Irene doesn’t make it any better.

Contrary to popular belief, Charles Xavier is not the first person that Raven truly loved. During her days when she was scavenging for food, Raven met someone who offered her love and care who was around the same age as her. They quickly became friends, and Raven felt something special towards this girl named Irene Adler. However, due to Irene’s power which enables her to foresee the future, she urged Raven to leave her behind immediately because of the devastation that will occur if she stayed any longer. This is why Raven did not want Charles to get into her head, because it will open up the wounds that may never heal completely and the trauma it caused. The fact that Charles reminds her a little bit of Irene doesn’t make it any better.

Posted at 12:52am on July 28th - 22406 NOTES

afro-dominicano:

sourcedumal:

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…
The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.
Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.
acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”
here’s an article that details some of his career.

I want a kickstarter made to get the real story done.

He deserves that much and more tbh.

afro-dominicano:

sourcedumal:

havecrayonswilltravel:

anonymousatheist420:

And now you know…


The real “Lone Ranger,” it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon. Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.

Historians of the American West have also, until recently, ignored the fact that this man was African American, a free black man who headed West to find himself less subject to the racist structure of the established Eastern and Southern states.

While historians have largely overlooked Reeves, there have been a few notable works on him. Vaunda Michaux Nelson’s book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal, won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author. Arthur Burton released an overview of the man’s life a few years ago. Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves recounts that Reeves was born into a life of slavery in 1838. His slave-keeper brought him along as another personal servant when he went off to fight with the Confederate Army, during the Civil War.

Reeves took the chaos that ensued during the war to escape for freedom, after beating his “master” within an inch of his life, or according to some sources, to death. Perhaps the most intriguing thing about this escape was that Reeves only beat his enslaver after the latter lost sorely at a game of cards with Reeves and attacked him.

After successfully defending himself from this attack, he knew that there was no way he would be allowed to live if he stuck around.

Reeves fled to the then Indian Territory of today’s Oklahoma and lived harmoniously among the Seminole and Creek Nations of Native American Indians.

After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshall in Arkansas and the Indian Territory. If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.

Burton explains that it was at this point that the Lone Ranger story comes into play. Reeves was described as a “master of disguises”. He used these disguises to track down wanted criminals, even adopting similar ways of dressing and mannerisms to meet and fit in with the fugitives, in order to identify them.

Reeves kept and gave out silver coins as a personal trademark of sorts, just like the Lone Ranger’s silver bullets. Of course, the recent Disney adaptation of the Lone Ranger devised a clever and meaningful explanation for the silver bullets in the classic tales. For the new Lone Ranger, the purpose was to not wantonly expend ammunition and in so doing devalue human life. But in the original series, there was never an explanation given, as this was simply something originally adapted from Reeves’ personal life and trademarking of himself. For Reeves, it had a very different meaning, he would give out the valuable coins to ingratiate himself to the people wherever he found himself working, collecting bounties. In this way, a visit from the real “Lone Ranger” meant only good fortune for the town: a criminal off the street and perhaps a lucky silver coin.

Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves was also an expert crack shot with a gun. According to legend, shooting competitions had an informal ban on allowing him to enter. Like the Lone Ranger, Reeves rode a white horse throughout almost all of his career, at one point riding a light grey one as well.

Like the famed Lone Ranger legend Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto. Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.

The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier.

Of course, WXYZ and the later TV and movie adaptions weren’t about to make the Lone Ranger an African American who began his career by beating a slave-keeper to death. But now you know. Spread the word and let people know the real legend of the Lone Ranger.

Via https://plus.google.com/b/113376504911684406239/109950959928032580820

okay no, but for real, this dude was a badass. he was basically the black batman of the wild west.

acording to wiki: “ Reeves brought in some of the most dangerous criminals of the time, but was never wounded, despite having his hat and belt shot off on separate occasions.”

here’s an article that details some of his career.

I want a kickstarter made to get the real story done.

He deserves that much and more tbh.

Posted at 12:51am on July 28th - 169247 NOTES

racebending:

chosengamer:

jamietheignorantamerican:

Go Forth and Educate Yourselves!

I’d also highly recommend watching the Jane Elliot Brown-eye/Blue-eye experiments, which can be found here:

Not only should you educate yourself but use this for good. Look around you and help others who don’t have this privilege. Hiring, donating, community service, etc.

After this post went viral, the original artist had to delete their tumblr because they were inundated with death threats.

There were people more offended by this comic than offended by the existence of racial disparities—to the point where they threatened this artist’s life.

Posted at 12:49am on July 28th - 64738 NOTES

juilan:

I have a color tv but all I see are white people

Posted at 12:48am on July 28th - 5100 NOTES

fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.
It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.

fishingboatproceeds:

beingthebesttryingtobebetter:

fishingboatproceeds:

This thing looks like a huge thermos, and it is. By keeping rotavirus and pneumonia vaccines cold for 50 days, it saves kids’ lives. I saw it work perfectly in a rural health outpost with no running water or electricity, just an amazing health worker using technology suited to her needs.

There are coolers that keep sperm and eggs frozen for decades.

Yeah, but those coolers need electricity, something in very short supply in rural Ethiopia. (More than 60 million Ethiopians live outside or urban centers, and most of them—and most of the health centers that serve them—are without power or running water.) There are refrigerators that use propane or gas to keep cool, but propane can be expensive and difficult to keep in steady supply, so these ridiculously efficient Thermoses are (literally) a life-saver.

It’s difficult to overstate the poverty here: Most of the plowing of fields is done with wooden plows drawn by cattle, and there are almost no cars on the roads. (Most people travel by foot or on handmade carts drawn by animals). That Ethiopia has been able to reduce under-5 mortality from 25% to 8% in the past 20 years despite this poverty and a very rural population is a tremendous success story, and with effectively outfitted health posts, that percentage will get even lower—hopefully within the next decade Ethiopia’s child mortality rate will fall below the current world average of 5%.

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